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JKM > Volume 41(2); 2020 > Article
Jang and Park: A Study on the Correlation between the Second Derivative of Photoplethysmogram and Quality of Life using SF-36 Questionnaire in Women

Abstract

Background and Objectives

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between between one’s quality of life (QoL) level and the arterial stiffness estimated by the second derivative of photoplethysmogram (SDPTG) for women patients.

Methods

A retrospective chart review was performed on charts of 407 women patients (38.38±11.82 years) who visited Gangdong Kyung Hee Hospital between April 1st and September 30th, 2011. Vascular aging index (VAI, (b-c-d)/a), b/a, c/a, and d/a were considered as the arterial stiffness indexes, and the Korean version of the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) were completed to estimate one’s physical and mental QoL.

Results

Physical and mental components of the SF-36 in older group (50, 60, and 70 years-group) were lower than those in younger group (20 and 30 years-group). Large arterial stiffness-related b/a in older group was higher that in younger group, while small arterial stiffness-related d/a in older group was lower that in younger group. Physical and mental component scores of the SF-36 had the negative correlations with VAI and b/a (r; −0.153~−0.195), while had the positive correlations with c/a and d/a (r; 0.147~0.228).

Conclusions

In conclusion, this study suggests that convenient and cost-effective SDPTG test may serve as an auxiliary tool to estimate one’s physical and mental QoL.

Table 1
Descriptive statistics of the physical components of the SF-36 and differences in the physical components by decade of age distribution
Decade of age distribution (number) PF RP BP GH Total scores of the physical subscales
10–19 (14) 88.57±11.67a 76.78±20.72a 67.43±17.87a 50.71±14.7a 283.50± 47.17a
20–29 (78) 83.33±17.22a,b 74.36±44.86a,b 66.41±28.64a 49.04±16.9a 273.14±82.77a,b
30–39 (150) 76.17±19.78a,b,c 56.83±38.09a,b,c 55.3±28.24a,b 44.00±17.4a 232.34±84.77a,b,c
40–49 (86) 73.49±21.78b,c 50.29±40.67a,b,c 51.93±27.17a,b 41.34±16.2a 217.05±83.52b,c
50–59 (60) 66.17±20.26c,d 38.75±39.44c 48.17±25.26a,b 39.33±17.77a 192.42±77.77c,d
60–69 (15) 72.00±22.35b,c 45.00±41.40b,c 44.60±25.62b 45.67±17.30a 207.27±82.21c,d
70–79 (4) 53.75±17.97d 18.75±23.94d 37.25±27.49b 38.75±25.29a 148.50±66.26d
F (p value) 6.392 (<0.001) 6.350 (<0.001) 4.188 (<0.001) 2.661 (0.015) 7.924 (<0.001)

PF; physical function), RP; role limitation due to physical health problems, BP; bodily pain, GH; general health..

a, b, c, ; age decade group where a specific score was determined to be homogeneous, through Duncan posthoc test. For example, RP scores of “10–19”, “20–29”, “30–39”, and “40–49” age groups are homogeneous, while RE values of “20–29”, “30–39”, “40–49”, and “60–69” age groups are homogeneous.

Table 2
Descriptive statistics of the mental components of the SF-36 and differences in the mental components by decade of age distribution
Decade of age distribution (number) VT SF RE MH Total scores of the mental subscales
10–19(14) 54.29± 11.91 83.29±18.60 81.00± 25.24a 38.57± 13.00 257.15±28.83a
20–29(78) 56.60±17.63 68.35± 24.89 72.68±36.00a,b 41.95±18.11 239.58±41.39a,b
30–39(150) 62.17±19.16 67.02±24.79 64.03±39.89a,b 46.21±19.66 239.43±44.95a,b
40–49(86) 57.97±17.68 64.88±23.32 53.48±46.12a,b,c 41.12±18.78 217.44±46.75b,c
50–59(60) 58.17±20.67 65.25±20.79 53.88±43.47b,c 38.93±17.86 216.23±46.67b,c
60–69(15) 62.33±21.78 71.07±26.92 44.40±44.87b,c 41.07±22.75 218.87±53.77b,c
70–79(4) 55.00±12.91 75.25±10.21 24.75±16.50c 41.00±10.52 196.00±39.18c
F (p value) 1.241 (0.197) 1.444 (0.197) 3.485 (0.002) 1.533 (0.166) 5.143 (<0.001)

VT; vitality, SF; social function, RE; role limitation due to physical emotional problems, MH; mental health.

a, b, c, ; age decade group where a specific score was determined to be homogeneous, through Duncan posthoc test. For example, RE scores of “10–19”, “20–29”, “30–39”, and “40–49” age groups are homogeneous, while RE values of “20–29”, “30–39”, “40–49”, “50–59”, and “60–69” age groups are homogeneous.

Table 3
Descriptive statistics of the SDPTG parameters and differences in the SDPTG parameters by decade of age distribution
Decade of age distribution (number) VAI b/a c/a d/a
10–19(14) −100.59±18.58a −88.18±7.57a 4.10±10.25a −13.98±5.74a
20–29(78) −85.10±22.41a,b −83.07±9.09a 2.52±11.19a −18.36±6.67a,b
30–39(150) −72.14±26.65b −79.24±10.63a −1.80±12.66a,b −24.05±8.16b,c
40–49(86) −47.63±32.25c −69.07±14.34b −9.58±12.27b,c −30.55±10.21c
50–59(60) −20.76±31.93d −58.04±13.21c −17.49±12.43c,d −40.69±11.66d
60–69(15) −15.29±46.73d −55.86±24.55c −19.32±8.18d −40.16±17.42d
70–79(4) −14.60±29.40d −55.78±16.58c −19.31±12.13d −44.49±13.71d
F (p value) 47.978 (<0.001) 40.429 (<0.001) 25.237 (<0.001) 48.280 (<0.001)

VT; vitality, SF; social function, RE; role limitation due to physical emotional problems, MH; mental health.

a, b, c, ; age decade group where a specific score was determined to be homogeneous, through Duncan posthoc test. For example, RE scores of “10–19”, “20–29”, “30–39”, and “40–49” age groups are homogeneous, while RE values of “20–29”, “30–39”, “40–49”, “50–59”, and “60–69” age groups are homogeneous.

Table 4
Descriptive statistics of the SF-36 subscales
SF-36 Subscale Minimum Maximum Mean ± SD
PF 5 145.00 75.56± 20.48
RP 0 300.00 56.02 ± 41.38
BP 0 123.00 55.53 ± 27.93
GH 0 90.00 43.96 ± 17.33
VT 5 100.000 59.29 ± 18.70
SF 0 100.00 67.35 ± 23.85
RE 0 167.00 61.44 ± 41.56
MH 0 100.00 42.74 ± 18.89

PF; physical function), RP; role limitation due to physical health problems, BP; bodily pain, GH; general health, VT; vitality, SF; social function, RE; role limitation due to physical emotional problems, MH; mental health.

Table 5
Descriptive statistics of the SDPTG parameters
SDPTG Parameter Minimum Maximum Mean ± SD
VAI −145.34 125.82 −60.19± 37.43
b/a −109.23 22.10 −73.92± 15.53
c/a −48.42 39.90 −5.54± 14.06
d/a −91.44 −3.88 −27.23± 12.27

VAI; vascular age index.

Table 6
Correlations between SDPTG parameters and physical and mental subscales of the SF-36 (n=407)
SF-36 Subscale of the SDPTG

VAI b/a c/a d/a
Physical component Pearson’s correlation −0.188 −0.153 0.228 0.148
P value <0.001 0.002 <0.001 0.003

Mental component Pearson’s correlation −0.195 −0.155 0.226 0.147
P value <0.001 0.002 <0.001 0.003

VAI; vascular age index. Bold numbers indicate significant Pearson’s correlation.

Table 7
Correlations between SDPTG parameters and the SF-36 subscales (n=407)
Subscale of the SF-36 Subscale of the SDPTG

VAI b/a c/a d/a
PF Pearson’s correlation −0.198 −0.170 0.199 0.184
P value <0.001 0.001 <0.001 <0.001

RP Pearson’s correlation −0.159 −0.131 0.190 0.139
P value 0.001 0.008 <0.001 0.005

BP Pearson’s correlation −0.143 −0.106 0.207 0.082
P value 0.004 0.032 <0.001 0.099

GH Pearson’s correlation −0.092 −0.077 0.106 0.057
P value 0.063 0.123 0.032 0.254

VT Pearson’s correlation 0.037 0.015 −0.078 −0.013
P value 0.458 0.759 0.115 0.801

SF Pearson’s correlation −0.063 −0.009 0.116 0.053
P value 0.207 0.857 0.019 0.282

RE Pearson’s correlation −0.178 −0.138 0.231 0.122
P value <0.001 0.005 <0.001 0.014

MH Pearson’s correlation −0.041 −0.078 −0.024 0.035
P value 0.406 0.116 0.623 0.486

VAI; vascular age index, PF; physical function), RP; role limitation due to physical health problems, BP; bodily pain, GH; general health, VT; vitality, SF; social function, RE; role limitation due to physical emotional problems, MH; mental health. Bold numbers indicate significant Pearson’s correlation.

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