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JKM > Volume 36(3); 2015 > Article
Lee, Jang, Jeon, and Yim: Effects of Polyporus Herbal-acupuncture at KI10 on LPS-induced nephritis in rats

Abstract

Objectives:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Polyporus Herbal-acupuncture(PO-HA) at KI10 (Umgok) on nephritis induced by lipopolysaccharide(LPS) in rats.

Methods:

Rats were allocated into normal, control, and 2 experimental groups. The rats in the control group were intra-peritoneally injected with LPS for nephritis induction. The rats in the groups of experiment 1 and experiment 2 were treated with Saline injection, and PO-HA, respectively at KI10 three times for a week and then intra-peritoneally injected with LPS. To evaluate the effects of PO-HA at KI10, WBC count in blood, creatine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1(CINC-1) in serum, urinary volume, creatinine, total protein in urine, myeloperoxidase(MPO) in kidney were measured.

Results:

PO-HA at KI10 significantly suppressed the increase of WBC in blood, TNF-α, CINC-1 in serum, MPO in kidney of LPS-stimulated rats. PO-HA at KI10 significantly suppressed the increase creatinine, total protein in urine of LPS-stimulated rats.

Conclusions:

According to these results, it is postulated that PO-HA at KI10 has an anti-inflammatory and renal-protective effects on LPS-induced nephritis in rats. Therefore, it is suggested that PO-HA at KI10 may be an useful therapeutics for nephritis in clinical field after further researches.

Fig. 1.
Cytotoxicity of PO-HAS on rat liver cells.
Liver cells from normal SD rat were cultured in RPMI 1640 with 10% FBS medium for 72h with or without various concentrations of PO-HAS (Polyporus Herbal-acupuncture solution). The cell viability were measured by MTT assay.
Values represent the means ± SD of 3 independent experiments. Control : culture medium without PO-HAS
10%, 2.5%, 1% PO-HAS : culture medium with 10%, 2.5%, 1% PO-HAS respectively
jkm-36-3-73f1.tif
Fig. 2.
Effect of PO-HA on WBC count in blood of LPS-stimulated rats.
Data were expressed as mean ± SD (n=5).
Normal : normal SD rat
LPS : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge
Saline : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and Saline(200μℓ/rat) injection at KI10
PO-HA : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and PO-HA(10%, 200μℓ/rat) at KI10
*** : p<0.001 compared to normal group by Kruskal-wallis test
††† : p<0.01 † : p<0.05 compared to LPS group by Kruskal -wallis test
# : p<0.05 compared to Saline group by Kruskal-wallis test
jkm-36-3-73f2.tif
Fig. 3.
Effects of PO-HA on serum creatinine level in LPS-stimulated rats.
Data were expressed as mean ± SD (n=5).
Normal : normal SD rat
LPS : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge
Saline : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and Saline(200μℓ/rat) injection at KI10
PO-HA : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and PO-HA(10%, 200μℓ/rat) at KI10
*** : p<0.001 compared to normal group by Kruskal-wallis test
## : p<0.01 compared to Saline group by Kruskal-wallis test
jkm-36-3-73f3.tif
Fig. 4.
Effects of PO-HA on serum TNF-alpha level in LPS-stimulated rats.
Data were expressed as mean ± SD (n=5).
Normal : normal SD rat
LPS : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge
Saline : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and Saline(200μℓ/rat) injection at KI10
PO-HA : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and PO-HA(10%, 200μℓ/rat) at KI10
*** : p<0.001 * : p<0.05 compared to normal group by Kruskal-wallis test
†† : p<0.01 compared to LPS group by Kruskal-wallis test
jkm-36-3-73f4.tif
Fig. 5.
Effects of PO-HA on serum CINC-1 level in LPS-stimulated rats.
Data were expressed as mean ± SD (n=5).
Normal : normal SD rat
LPS : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge
Saline : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and Saline(200μℓ/rat) injection at KI10 PO-HA : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and PO-HA(10%, 200μℓ/rat) at KI10
*** : p<0.001 ** : p<0.01 compared to normal group by Kruskal -wallis test
†† : p<0.01 compared to LPS group by ANOVA test
jkm-36-3-73f5.tif
Fig. 6.
Effect of PO-HA on urinary volume in LPS-stimulated rats.
Data were expressed as mean ± SD (n=3).
Normal : normal SD rat
LPS : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge
Saline : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and Saline(200μℓ/rat) injection at KI10
PO-HA : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and PO-HA(10%, 200μℓ/rat) at KI10
** : p<0.01 * : p<0.05 compared to normal group by Kruskal-wallis test
jkm-36-3-73f6.tif
Fig. 7.
Effects of PO-HA on urinary creatinine level in LPS-stimulated rats.
Data were expressed as mean ± SD (n=3).
Normal : normal SD rat
LPS : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge
Saline : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and Saline(200μℓ/rat) injection at KI10
PO-HA : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and PO-HA(10%, 200μℓ/rat) at KI10
* : p<0.05 compared to normal group by Kruskal-wallis test
††† : p<0.001 compared to LPS group by Kruskal-wallis test
## : p<0.01 compared to Saline group by Kruskal-wallis test
jkm-36-3-73f7.tif
Fig. 8.
Effects of PO-HA on total protein level in urine of LPS-stimulated rats.
Data were expressed as mean ± SD (n=3).
Normal : normal SD rat
LPS : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge
Saline : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and Saline(200μℓ/rat) injection at KI10
PO-HA : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and PO-HA(10%, 200μℓ/rat) at KI10
* : p<0.05 compared to normal group by Kruskal-wallis test
† : p<0.05 compared to LPS group by Kruskal-wallis test
jkm-36-3-73f8.tif
Fig. 9.
Effects of PO-HA on renal MPO level in LPS-stimulated rats.
Data were expressed as mean ± SD (n=5).
Normal : normal SD rat
LPS : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge
Saline : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and Saline(200μℓ/rat) injection at KI10
PO-HA : LPS (2mg/kg) challenge and PO-HA(10%, 200μℓ/rat) at KI10
*** : p<0.001 compared to normal group by Kruskal-wallis test
†† : p<0.01 compared to LPS group by Kruskal-wallis test
jkm-36-3-73f9.tif
Scheme 1.
Manufacturing procedure of Polyporus Herbal-acupuncture Solution.
jkm-36-3-73s1.tif

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