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JKM > Volume 34(3); 2013 > Article
Cho, Kim, Kim, and Song: Relationship Between Nutrient Intakes and Blood Biochemical Parameters of Korean Female Subjects Classified by Eight Constitution Medicine

Abstract

Objectives:

To investigate the relationship between nutrient intakes and blood biochemical parameters of Korean women classified by the Eight Constitutions.

Methods:

The constitutions of female subjects were determined by the methods of eight constitutional pulse formation. Anthropometric characteristics and blood biochemical parameters including fasting blood glucose (FSB), serum lipid profiles, homocysteine, and insulin were determined. Food frequency questionnaires were used to evaluate the nutrient intake of the subjects.

Results:

Subjects were classified as Hepatonia 16.8%, Cholecystonia 2.8%, Pancreotonia 58.9%, Pulmotonia 5.1%, Colonotonia 16.4%, respectively. Gastrotonia, Renotonia, and Vesicotonia individuals were not present in this study. BMI, total calorie and fat intakes of the Mok constitutions (Hepatonia and Cholecystonia) were higher than those of the Gum constitutions (Pulmotonia and Colonotonia) (p<0.05). Triglyceride, total cholesterol, and LDL-C concentrations for the Cholecystonia were the highest while those for the Pulmotonia (p<0.05) were lowest, which is in line with the results from nutrient intakes.

Conclusions:

Total calorie and fat intake among subjects with different constitutions were different. BMI and serum lipid profiles positively associated with calorie and nutrients intakes were significantly higher in Mok constitutions than Gum constitutions. Personalized diet plans seem to be needed for subjects on a special diet due to the individual constitutional differences.

Figure 1.
LEFT: Left hand of patient
RIGHT: Right hand of patient
1: Pulse detected by 1st (index) finger of physician
2: Pulse detected by 2nd (middle) finger of physician
3: Pulse detected 3rd finger of physician
jkm-34-3-143-12f1.tif
Table 1.
Eight Constitution of Korean Women1) Participated in the Study
Constitution subjects Percent(%)
Hepatonia 36 16.8
Cholecystonia 6 2.8
Pancreotonia 126 58.9
Gastrotonia - -
Pulmotonia 11 5.1
Colonotonia 35 16.4
Renotonia - -
Vesicotonia - -

Total 214 100

1) Female subjects aged between 20 to 70 years old were participated

Table 2.
Comparisons of the Anthropometry Characteristics Among the Subjects Classified by the Eight Constitution
Constitution N Height (Cm) Weight (Kg) BMI (Kg/m2)
Hepatonia 36 159.85 ± 6.38NS 59.46 ± 8.52a 23.38 ± 3.27a
Cholecystonia 6 159.35 ± 6.02 59.17 ± 6.50a 23.42 ± 3.42a
Pancreotonia 126 157.23 ± 5.40 57.11 ± 6.95ab 23.12 ± 2.74a
Gastrotonia - - - -
Pulmotonia 11 159.37 ± 4.29 52.59 ± 5.90b 20.70 ± 2.07b
Colonotonia 35 159.70 ± 5.78 52.51 ± 6.41b 20.58 ± 2.24b
Renotonia - - - -
Vesicotonia - - - -

Values are mean ± SD

BMI : Body Mass Index

a,b Data in the column are significantly different by one-way ANOVA followed by Duncan’s multiple range test at the 0.05 level of significance.

NS Not significantly different.

Table 3.
Energy Consumption and the Amounts of Major Nutrient Intakes of the Subjects Classified by the Eight Constitution
Constitution N Energy (Kcal) Carbohydrate (g) Protein (g) Total fat (g)
Hepatonia 36 2270.82 ± 788.751)NS 361.76 ± 117.28NS 90.52 ± 36.28NS 52.52 ± 29.91ab
Cholecystonia 6 2411.15 ± 898.74 256.52 ± 121.59 102.57 ± 44.26 65.49 ± 32.44a
Pancreotonia 126 2131.66 ± 816.82 350.69 ± 134.35 83.29 ± 34.24 46.38 ± 24.32ab
Gastrotonia - - - - -
Pulmotonia 11 2225.84 ± 447.19 357.95 ± 83.33 92.17 ± 22.41 50.53 ± 14.08ab
Colonotonia 35 2033.45 ± 758.52 330.94 ± 116.61 80.75 ± 35.41 43.26 ± 22.80b
Renotonia - - - - -
Vesicotonia - - - - -

1) Values are mean ± SD

a,b Data in the column are significantly different by one-way ANOVA followed by Duncan’s multiple range test at the 0.05 level of significance.

NS Not significantly different.

Table 4.
The Ratio for Nutrient Intakes to the Total Energy Consumption of Subjects Classified by the Eight Constitution
Constitution N Carbohydrate (%) Protein (%) Total fat (%)
Hepatonia 36 64.48 ± 8.21ab 15.82 ± 2.35NS 20.02 ± 6.27b
Cholecystonia 6 59.78 ± 6.58b 16.98 ± 2.49 23.86 ± 4.68a
Pancreotonia 126 66.30 ± 6.43a 15.54 ± 2.25 19.10 ± 4.86b
Gastrotonia - - - -
Pulmotonia 11 64.18 ± 6.91ab 16.67 ± 3.04 20.53 ± 4.56ab
Colonotonia 35 65.97 ± 6.87a 15.64 ± 2.72 18.42 ± 4.58b
Renotonia - - - -
Vesicotonia - - - -

Values are mean ± SD

a,b Data in the column are significantly different by one-way ANOVA followed by Duncan’s multiple range test at the 0.05 level of significance.

NS Not significantly different.

Table 5.
Concentrations of Serum Glucose, Insulin, and Homocysteine of the Subjects Classified by the Eight Constitution
Constitution N Glucose (mg/dL) Insulin (ng/mL) homocysteine (umol/L)
Hepatonia 36 69.36 ± 12.83NS 4.16 ± 1.72NS 8.95 ± 2.80NS
Cholecystonia 6 68.17 ± 13.08 4.54 ± 2.28 8.73 ± 2.78
Pancreotonia 126 67.87 ± 14.32 4.17 ± 2.31 8.86 ± 2.55
Gastrotonia - - - -
Pulmotonia 11 73.73 ± 11.14 5.69 ± 6.31 8.51 ± 3.85
Colonotonia 35 68.66 ± 10.88 4.17 ± 2.60 8.77 ± 2.92
Renotonia - - - -
Vesicotonia - - - -

Values are mean ± SD

NS Not significantly different.

Table 6.
Serum Lipid Profiles of the Subjects Classified by the Eight Constitution
Constitution N Triglyceride Total cholesterol LDL-C HDL-C (mg/dL)
Hepatonia 36 73.31 ± 42.65ab 182.25 ± 26.78ab 109.83 ± 26.48ab 61.28 ± 12.74NS
Cholecystonia 6 102.67 ± 39.42a 200.00 ± 45.04a 123.60 ± 38.14a 55.83 ± 6.37
Pancreotonia 126 86.90 ± 42.40ab 191.27 ± 31.39ab 118.00 ± 31.28a 57.98 ± 11.72
Gastrotonia - - - - -
Pulmotonia 11 66.91 ± 19.02b 157.64 ± 30.31c 93.64 ± 30.01b 53.91 ± 7.29
Colonotonia 35 73.17 ± 36.18ab 175.20 ± 29.11bc 101.35 ± 24.81ab 61.11 ± 13.23
Renotonia - - - - -
Vesicotonia - - - - -

1) Values are mean ± SD

a–c Data in the column are significantly different by one-way ANOVA followed by Duncan’s multiple range test at the 0.05 level of significance.

NS Not significantly different.

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